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  1. Commons Logging
  2. LOGGING-132

Jdk14Logger wrapper does not respect logger name

    Details

    • Type: Bug
    • Status: Closed
    • Priority: Minor
    • Resolution: Fixed
    • Affects Version/s: Nightly Builds, 1.0, 1.0.1, 1.0.2, 1.0.3, 1.0.4, 1.1.0, 1.1.1, 1.1.2
    • Fix Version/s: 1.1.2
    • Labels:
      None

      Description

      The JDK14 wrapper implementation logs using the callers class name instead of the configured logger name. This prevents the ability to use named loggers for applications and subsystems. Also, the log message name does not match the JDK logger name so user don't know what name to use to configure the logger. It is also problematic for obfuscated code and private parts of an application or library.

      Example:
      I have a class named com.myco.product.subsysa.ClassX.InnerClassY and I create logger LogFactory.getLog("SubSystemA").

      With the other log wrappers, if I log a message I always get something like:

      Oct 21, 2009 5:03:26 PM
      [INFO] SubSystemA start - My log message

      With the JDK log wrapper, I get something like:

      Oct 21, 2009 5:03:26 PM com.myco.product.subsysa.ClassX$InnerClassY start
      INFO: My log message

      Or worse yet with obfuscated code and the JDK log wrapper, I get something like:

      Oct 21, 2009 5:03:26 PM com.myco.product.subsysa.ClassX$_oOOO.o00000000000000000000000000000
      0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
      0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
      00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
      INFO: My log message

      The fix:

      In the calls to logger.logp(...), replace cname with this.name. Loggers created with the class name will still get the class name.

          private void log( Level level, String msg, Throwable ex ) {
      
              Logger logger = getLogger();
              if (logger.isLoggable(level)) {
                  // Hack (?) to get the stack trace.
                  Throwable dummyException=new Throwable();
                  StackTraceElement locations[]=dummyException.getStackTrace();
                  // Caller will be the third element
                  String cname="unknown";
                  String method="unknown";
                  if( locations!=null && locations.length >2 ) {
                      StackTraceElement caller=locations[2];
                      cname=caller.getClassName();
                      method=caller.getMethodName();
                  }
                  if( ex==null ) {
                      logger.logp( level, cname, method, msg );
                  } else {
                      logger.logp( level, cname, method, msg, ex );
                  }
              }
      
          }
      

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            • Assignee:
              Unassigned
              Reporter:
              nathann@objectfx.com Nathan Niesen
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              Dates

              • Created:
                Updated:
                Resolved: